What To Look For When Purchasing A Home

We focus a lot on skills and things, but what about the main thing: shelter? I realize a lot of people have a general idea, and are usually reading these from the confines of their condo, apartment, or house, but how does your place of residence fit into your preparations and self-reliance?

No, you don’t need to live on a hundred acres to be self-reliant. But owning a home and having space does help. So, what about when you do look for when thinking about purchasing property?

Here is a list of some things that you may want to look for:

  1. Look at the general area. How far out are you? How far in are you? How close are your neighbors? I’m not saying don’t live in a community, but I am saying look at the area. Is the area generally good, or generally bad? Do your neighbors take care of their homes, or not?

These are big issues, because you don’t want to live next to someone who’s property is decreasing what your newly purchased home is worth. Nor do you want to live in a high-crime area.

  1. The quality and age of the structures on the property. When you get your inspection, or even before, you should be looking at how old the home is and how well it was maintained. If the home is older, and it wasn’t properly maintained, it may cost you big dollars to bring it up to par if anything goes wrong. I might also suggest getting a home warranty for the first year, in addition to your homeowner’s insurance.
  1. Does it have a wood-burning fireplace? This is one that is often overlooked, because we don’t think of fireplaces anymore. Most of the modern fireplaces are either gas or electric, which will work fine when everything is dandy, but won’t do you much good when the power is out. Many people think gas will work fine in short-term situations, but many gas fireplaces, still require electricity for the fan.
  1. How much yard is there? Like I said before, you don’t need a hundred acres, but some acreage is preferable. One the other side, if you live in an area where acreage isn’t common, just look for one with some semblance of a yard. You can have a full garden, with chickens, roosters, a pig or two, and few others animals on a standard quarter-acre lot – it just all depends on how you organize it.
  1. Newer and properly installed insulation. When it comes to creating the heat, it’s worthless if you can’t keep it. Insulation will help your home stay warm in colder months, and lowering your electricity bill along the way.
  1. Double (or more) Paned Windows. In the same boat as above, single pane windows are a heat-sink. They let any heat out, without one single word to say about it. If you have older or single pane windows, consider upgrading them. This will also reduce your electricity bill – and may earn you a credit for preferring efficiency.
  1. The roof and other updates. Replacing a roof is a crazy expense, as well as kitchens and bathrooms. So, when looking for a new home, you don’t want to pay a lot of money, and then have a sink a bunch more in to fix a bunch of things – unless the home is being sold as a good deal, that is.

After reviewing this list, make sure there’s a few of your own on there. Personalize your wants and needs when looking at investing in a home purchase. Of course most people want their home to be beautiful and perfect, but always keep in mind the practical side of home buying, and ensuring you won’t too quickly outgrow your home.

Thank you for reading my article today. As always, if you have a comment, please leave it below; or if you have a suggestion on a topic, please contact me via the contact page above!

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